Living As A Cancer Survivor - Persistence

Mark Everett Kelly, seen here with his best pal Sammy, was diagnosed with Stage IV Rhabdomyosarcoma on December 12, 1990. He was given six months to survive. To read more about Mark’s story, please click on  “My Scars Tell A Story” .

Mark Everett Kelly, seen here with his best pal Sammy, was diagnosed with Stage IV Rhabdomyosarcoma on December 12, 1990. He was given six months to survive. To read more about Mark’s story, please click on “My Scars Tell A Story”.

The longer I'm here on earth, the more I realize how vital persistence is in our daily decisions. When you have survived an ordeal like cancer, it becomes even more critical.

When we think of what persistence means, what words come to mind? Tenacity? Determination? The definition that dictionary.com gives for persistence is "firm or obstinate continuance in a course of action in spite of difficulty or opposition."

Click here to purchase a copy of “My Scars Tell A Story”

Click here to purchase a copy of “My Scars Tell A Story”

Life post-treatment does not involve the same desperation and fears. However, the side effects can take a younger person and cripple them for life. I try to be as sensitive as I can when I counsel someone whose permanent side effects are now part of their life.

When I first finished treatment, I often received the question of "what was it like?". My answer is always the same. "You don't want to know."

What I understood then is you have to be just as relentless against this disease as it is against you. You have to be persistent. The battle turns post-treatment into a mental war. Every day you can be faced with a reminder of things that you can no longer do. After you thought you had won the battle of your life, you realize that the damage inflicted has forever changed you.

The body you had before treatment no longer exits. Your ability to perform physical tasks can create feelings of inadequacy that was not part of your life before.

In my understanding of the battle cancer makes you fight, it traps you in the corner than locks the door. While it didn't kill you during treatment, it now will claw and scar you until you can't get out of the room.

Our only choice in those situations is to pray for strength and keep fighting back. You need to keep getting up and spit in its face. Persevere. Before you know it, cancer will be worn out. Your attitude of getting up every day and spitting in the face of an enemy that wants to kill you will inspire those around you.

My thoughts are prayers are with you.

WHERE TO FIND ME

I can always be reached by email (CKMagicSports@gmail or LivingAsACancerSurvivor@gmail). Please see the links below to follow me or contact me on social sites. I welcome (need) more followers and supporters. Please don't be shy about sharing your thoughts.  

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NEXT BLOG DATE: Monday, September 23, 2019

 

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