Living As A Cancer Survivor - Forgiveness

Below you will find a brief section of today’s blog

One thing we all struggle with is forgiveness. I have made some brutal mistakes that have devastated others and been incredibly selfish. I have been the poster boy for thinking only of myself. When I felt convicted and made aware of my behavior, I experienced long seasons of remorse and self-loathing.

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Dying Cancer Patient Final Words Inspire Many

Below you will find a brief section of today’s blog.

When you are facing death, the thoughts, words, and advice that form in your mind are remarkable. There were a few times during my brush with death that I expressed my views about what is essential in life.

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Living As A Cancer Survivor: Actions speak loudest

Below you will find a brief section of today’s blog.

When you are dealing with cancer, many things will be outside of your control. As a family member, spouse, sibling, or parent, seeing a loved one suffer is one of the worst feelings you will experience. The sentiment is mutual for the patient or survivor. 

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Another Perspective Part 5 - Questions Anyone?

The following excerpt is the third thing that Rachael Yahne’s mentions in her article “5 Things that they never tell you about life after cancer

People will be scared to ask you questions (even though they'll have a lot of questions)

I'm not sure why people are scared to talk to me about it. I know they are just trying to be gracious, and I can't speak for all survivors, but as far as this one goes: ask away. If you have a question, let me answer it. If you wonder something - from what it's like to be on steroids to whether I lost my eyelashes and eyebrows too - go ahead! Sure there are days in my regular, healthy life after cancer that I'm not giddy to talk about it. But when it really comes down to facts, I'd rather help you understand so that if ever you know someone who has to go through this battle. That way, you'll know more of what to expect and what that person might need. Additionally, if you're my friend, I'd like you to know me. So don't be afraid of me or afraid to talk to me, it only makes me feel 'othered' as Janet Mock says.

The truth is, every cancer fighter's experience will be incredible different. The fact that we need to talk more about the struggles after cancer is a very good sign to me, because it shows that we are at a point where survival is up, and people are looking to thrive and live well after cancer. So don't be afraid to talk about it, don't be afraid to reach out.


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Another Perspective Part 4 - Awkward Conversations

The following excerpt is the fourth thing that Rachael Yahne’s mentions in her article “5 Things that they never tell you about life after cancer

There will be some awkward conversations...

In life after cancer and treatment, even the physical parts of your being are different. Especially when it comes to dating. There are scars. There is skin that is very tender to the touch because of the radiation. There are hangups and insecurities that are caused by the way my body is different now. So yes, there will be a level of communication absolutely necessary to make sure both partners are comfortable.

And there will be even worse conversations about it. There will have to be talks about what the future looks like with someone who has been through treatment, and who can never guarantee that it won't come back. There will have to be talks about what life would look like if it did come back. There will have to be a shared courage around it. There will have to be openness and honesty to a degree that most couples don't have to offer. But trust me, it will make your love so much richer and more incredible.

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Another Perspective Part 3 - Fear

The following excerpt is the third thing that Rachael Yahne’s mentions in her article “5 Things that they never tell you about life after cancer

There will be a new sense of fear in every part of your life

It just doesn't look the same once you know how fragile your life is. That fear, of the past and of it coming back, can haunt you for the rest of your life after cancer. But what I like to tell others in my public speeches and online articles (even the ones not about cancer) is that even though there will always be fear, you don't have to let that fear decide what you do and how you feel. You don't have to let that fear run your life or even ruin your mood. You can feel it, acknowledge it, and still choose to love and to be joyous and even to take risks in your life after cancer (whether you've experienced it or someone you love). You don't have to be ruled by it; you just have to choose to live from and for something greater than that fear.

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